ProgrammingFonts

September 18, 2015
I've been using the Monaco font that ships with OS X for a few years now I guess (still in RubyMine since joining LivingSocial in 2011). Haven't been paying too close attention. I did start using the Solarized Dark and Light color schemes for a few years as well - still using Dark with iTerm and Light inside RubyMine.

Tonight I heard about Hack and decided to swap that in and give it a go. - Sep 6 2015

... and I've switched back to Monaco. Hack was fine, but looked a little ‘stark’ in RubyMine. Monaco renders better. - Sep 18 2015



Andale Mono was my fav across the board circa 2008. Google's Droid font is similar, but has a couple of problems:
- Capital O doesn't look any different from zero.
- In some IDEs (Eclipse), the anti-aliasing (I presume) is too blurry.


Andale Mono
Looks nice pretty much anywhere.

Droid Sans Mono
From the Google Android project.

Eclipse: Anti-aliasing is not to my liking. More blurry than readable.
jEdit: looks good
VS2005: little anti-aliasing blur effect, but not much.

Envy Code
Envy Code B
Envy Code R v0.7

Eclipse 3.3: looks weird - anti-aliasing or something makes my eyes crazy
jEdit 4.2: 12 pt too small/thin? 14 pt looks good, but a bit too big?
VS2005: 10pt too thin? 12pt too big?
Damien's programming fonts

Proggy fonts
From Keith Devens's page linked above, and his personal recommendation. Lowercase ‘a’ and ‘o’ are clearly different - so it's better in that way than MonteCarlo. Also has .fon and .ttf versions, so I can make jEdit happy (TT only) and any other Windows editors happy, too.

Proggy Clean and Proggy Tiny are nice. Proggy Tiny is too tiny on a large resolution like 1600x1200 for me. The problem with Proggy Clean is that it ain't monospaced. And not just with bold characters, but even the regular hyphen is wider than most characters. (Maybe TT only? Does it have a non-TT?)

MonteCarlo
cons: lowercase ‘a’ looks a lot like lowercase ‘o’ at small point size. (And with a Dvorak layout, ‘a’ and ‘o’ are right next to each other). It's not True Type, though, so it doesn't work with jEdit.

ProFont
non-True Type version had different letter widths for bold characters (or somesuch).

Keith Devens's Programmer Font Page (Thanks to Pavel Trka for the link)


M+ is another one I need to check out.


tags: ComputersAndTechnology
comments powered by Disqus